Update: Colorado Wildlife and Transportation

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From 2005-2014, the total average cost of wildlife-vehicle collisions to Colorado citizens (not including the value of the wildlife killed and impacts to wildlife populations) was $57.3 million/year. In addition, there are an average of 3.3 human deaths as a result of wildlife-vehicle collisions per year and many more wildlife deaths. The Colorado Wildlife and Transportation Steering Committee is working hard to decrease these numbers.

In November of 2017, CDR posted this article about a new initiative addressing highway permeability in Colorado’s wildlife migration corridors. Since then, CDR has begun coordinating efforts between CDOT, CPW, FHWA, USFS, Mule Deer Foundation, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, and the Southern Ute Indian Tribe focused on Colorado’s wildlife and transportation integration. A Steering Committee has been formed to “provide safe passage for people and wildlife in Colorado,” and leaders from both the west and east slope are participating in the conversation. To achieve their goal, the group will identify ways to incorporate wildlife crossings into highway planning as well as look at habitat restoration along migration routes.

Currently, the initiative is in its formative stages and is working on both West and East Slope Wildlife Prioritization Studies. These studies, led by CDR partner JACOBS, will help the Steering Committee identify both highways and roads as well as species to prioritize when incorporating wildlife movement and habitats into highway planning. Once this data is collected, CDR and JACOBS will work together with the Committee to determine pathways for effectively sharing data across agencies and with the public. In addition to developing Committee buy-in for the initiative, CDR will be developing a broad engagement and education strategy across the state.

CDR is spearheading Steering Committee coordination and is committed to keeping the momentum from the successful 2017 Wildlife and Transportation Summit going. CDR has facilitated two Steering Committee meetings in 2018, establishing the group’s mission, vision, and goals through July 2019. Additional meetings are planned as the group begins to work on forming education opportunities, partnerships, and procedures.

We will continue to update you on education opportunities in your area and post group updates as they arise.

For more information contact Taber Ward. (tward@mediate.org)

Getting To The Heart of Conflict

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GETTING TO THE HEART OF CONFLICT

A Workshop with Author BERNIE MAYER

Sponsored by CDR Associates, Univ. of Denver Conflict Resolution Institute, and Cathy Schultheis, Co-Chair of the ADR Section of the Boulder County Bar Assoc.
RESCHEDULED FOR
May 4, 2018 from 8:45 – 2:00

Bernie Mayer, is well known to many of us as a founding partner of CDR Associates, and a long time mediator and conflict specialist. In this small, interactive, ½ day program, Bernie returns to Boulder to work with us on how to best understand the most essential conflicts our clients face and the biggest obstacles we encounter in helping to deal with these in a constructive way. He will ask us to look beyond interests to the underlying human needs that drive conflict and to contend with the polarized view that clients, and many of the professionals they work with, hold about the nature of their conflicts and the choices they face.

• The workshop fee of $99.00 includes lunch. Space is limited. First come first serve. CLE Application is pending.

• 7560 Monarch Road in Niwot, off Highway 52, just east of IBM

• RSVP to Cathy Schultheis at (303) 652-3638 or email at cathyboulderagent@yahoo.com. Your registration will be confirmed promptly.

Bernie Mayer, PhD, is a Professor of Conflict Studies, in the Program on Negotiation and Conflict Resolution, Creighton University. He has provided conflict intervention for families, communities, NGO’s, unions, corporations, and governmental agencies throughout North America and internationally for over 35 years. Bernie’s most recent book is The Conflict Paradox, Seven Dilemmas at the Core of Disputes. Earlier books include: The Dynamics of Conflict, Beyond Neutrality, and Staying With Conflict. Bernie received the 2015 John Haynes Distinguished Mediator Award, presented by the Association for Conflict Resolution, the 2013 President’s Award presented by the Association of Family Conciliation Courts, and the 2009 Meyer Elkin Award, also presented by the AFCC.

A Bernie Mayer BEYOND INTERESTS.doc FOR MAY 4TH (2)

Generosity and Wisdom – CDR Partner Louise Smart

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It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of CDR Partner Louise Smart. Louise was an instrumental member of the CDR team for over 20 years–developing our nationally renowned transportation practice area, mentoring and training hundreds of practitioners, as well as authoring numerous influential guidance documents that integrated dispute resolution concepts with transportation decision making. Her commitment to crafting practical positive change was wide-reaching.

Thank you, Louise.

New Staff

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Jeffrey Range

Jeffrey rejoins CDR with nearly a decade of experience internationally and in the U.S. He’s worked with government agencies, NGO’s, and companies in areas including land use, development, environmental sustainability, and organizational effectiveness. Please contact Jeffrey at jrange@mediate.org

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Spencer Dodge

Spencer assists in the design and facilitation of meetings across a broad spectrum of issues. Receiving his Master’s in Conflict Resolution from the Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver, he is committed to enhancing honest, collaborative processes by building relationships, solving problems creatively, and engaging with a diverse range of stakeholders. Please contact Spencer at sdodge@mediate.org

It’s All About the Context – Facilitating Transportation and Community Decision Making

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The I-70 Mountain corridor is the gateway to the Rocky Mountains from the Denver Metro area. It offers breathtaking views, access to unique and historic mountain communities, and rich natural heritage and resources. The corridor serves as a recreational destination for the world, a route for interstate and local commerce, and a unique place to live and play.  I-70 is also federally designated as a high priority corridor, a significant part of the defense network, a major east/west continental corridor, and a major economic corridor for Colorado.  For many local communities along the corridor, I-70 is the lifeline, primary access, and only connection to other communities.

Current I-70 roadway geometry is constrained with narrow shoulders and tight curves that impact safety, mobility, accessibility, and capacity for travelers and residents.  CDR has been working with the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) in partnership with local jurisdictions, landowners, and a variety of stakeholders along the I-70 corridor, to implement a Context Sensitive Solutions (CSS) process that will result in solutions to improve the westbound highway and the communities along the road. The goal is to develop transportation solutions that respect the unique environmental, historic, community, and recreational resources in the study area. Additionally, improvements are needed to lessen delays caused by peak period volumes.

Preliminary options have been developed during the Concept Development Process, and will now be moved forward in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process and toward implementation over the next few years.  As the process transitions into NEPA, CDR Associates will continue facilitating and engaging a diverse stakeholder group – from county representatives, recreational rafting and cycling groups, US Forest Service, businesses and residents.  Our goal is to provide a forum to effectively develop and communicate a shared vision and goals for the corridor that will safely and efficiently move people and freight while respecting and prioritizing the communities, ecosystems, and wildlife.

Contact: Taber Ward or Jonathan Bartsch

Wildlife and Transportation Summit: Providing Safe Passage for People and Wildlife

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We’ve all seen it: the unrecognizable remains of some beautiful animal on the side of the road that happened to try and cross traffic at an inopportune time. Unfortunately, this sight is all too common for those living in Colorado – in 2016, the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) reported nearly 7,000 wild animals killed by passing trucks and cars, resulting in two human fatalities and almost 400 injuries.

With the largest elk herd in North America and a rapidly expanding population, different agencies including the Colorado DOT, Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW), United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) are coordinating to alleviate strains on migratory animals as well as animals residing near high speed corridors.

While determining how to practically solve this growing problem is complicated, recent coordinated action has provided direction. To this end, in June 2017, CDR spearheaded the design and facilitation of the Wildlife and Transportation Summit in Silverthorne, Colorado – a two-day multi-agency, interdisciplinary conference hosted by CDOT, CPW, and FHWA. The Summit established partnerships and developed recommendations to improve highway safety and protect wildlife populations.  Summit attendees included multiple state agencies, USFWS, the US Forest Service, legislators, the Nature Conservancy, private landowners, the freight industry, foundations, academia, and wildlife experts.

CDR focused on building momentum and finding common goals among policymakers, agency staff and public-private stakeholders to develop strategies and identify funding for wildlife crossings, mitigation work and herd migration.

The Summit focused on issues, including:

  • wildlife migration and permeability
  • animal-vehicle collisions
  • highway safety
  • highway mitigation features (fencing, overpasses, underpasses)
  • partnership opportunities

What’s Next?

Summit recommendations were recently presented and discussed with the Transportation Environmental Resource Council (TERC), a Colorado inter-agency forum. CDR will be working with CDOT, CPW, and FHWA to facilitate and implement the Summit recommendations and develop an Action Plan beginning with a focus on the West Slope of Colorado beginning in early 2018.

Contact Taber Ward or Spencer Dodge for more information.